MTJAW – Nadia Sagar

Being a woman encompasses for me things spiritual and physical, my sexuality, my courage, my strength, my smarts and perhaps most importantly my connection to this earth, this living breathing organism of which I am a small but significant element. – Nadia Sagar

Editor’s Note: Nadia Sagar’s voice has been clear, strong and steady against corruption, racism and injustices in Guyana. She’s responsible for the image of cook-up and achar in my head right now because she already knows that we Guyanese are just a part of each other and what we bring together is something very beautiful. The following is a summary of Nadia’s responses to a series of questions asked by the More Than Just a Woman Campaign. It is not to be reproduced in part or whole without permission from the Lady Magazine & NGO.

Nadia Sagar

Nadia Sagar

Attorney/ Activist/Aspiring writer

On being Guyanese – For as long as I have known myself I have felt an inexplicable connection to Guyana.  I consider myself fortunate to be a daughter of this magnificent place whose beauty lies not just in the flora and fauna that sustains us but also in the spirit of the people who inhabit this space.

Being a woman encompasses for me things spiritual and physical, my sexuality, my courage, my strength, my smarts and perhaps most importantly my connection to this earth, this living breathing organism of which I am a small but significant element.   Nature has made me capable of bearing offspring.  What greater gift is there than to create life, to be connected to another living thing, to nourish that being and witness its evolution.  I consider myself fortunate to be imbued with such gifts.

The best thing about being a woman in Guyana is the knowledge that I stand on the shoulders of many strong, capable women who came from places far from here and whose struggles allowed me my freedoms which I can never take for granted.

The hardest thing about being a woman is to be afraid to be a woman, recognising that a society built on patriarchal values renders one vulnerable and often helpless in the face of systems which seek to shape and control our bodies and our interaction with the world.

If I could change the lives of Guyanese women I would want them to understand that they do not have to persevere, to submit, to be quiet or to accept their place.

Advertisements

Tell us what you think...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s